What is chrysotile?

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Chrysotile is a fibrous mineral which does not burn or rot. It is resistant to most chemicals; it is flexible and possesses high tensile strength. This unique combination of properties makes chrysotile an extremely useful material which has been established, for many decades, as a major component of lightweight reinforced cement products, friction materials, high temperature seals and gaskets and a host of other applications.

 

Chrysotile has been known for over 2000 years, being used initially for cremation cloths, oil lamp wicks and other textiles. But it is only in the 19th Century that chrysotile was first mined commercially in the Urals (Russia), in Italy and in Canada.

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